Catholic Economy – Obotafumeiro http://obotafumeiro.com/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 10:59:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://obotafumeiro.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-5.png Catholic Economy – Obotafumeiro http://obotafumeiro.com/ 32 32 Maine’s idea: Irish peace could have bizarre consequences https://obotafumeiro.com/maines-idea-irish-peace-could-have-bizarre-consequences/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 09:00:50 +0000 https://obotafumeiro.com/maines-idea-irish-peace-could-have-bizarre-consequences/

When traveling the world, for his law firm and as an informal global ambassador, George Mitchell often spoke of the commonalities he found in people of all continents, among all religions, nationalities and ethnicities.

Parents want the same things for their children, he said: a good education, health care, good jobs – and an absence of violence, in the community and the nation.

Mitchell had credibility as he negotiated, transpired and managed the Good Friday deal that brought peace to Northern Ireland in 1998, and ended the intermittent war that plagued an entire generation.

The Good Friday deal, which is expected to last at least as long as “The Troubles” that preceded it, has lasted beyond expectations.

Peace never seems to sell newspapers like wars and political conflicts, but perhaps more importantly – a point to remember in our own time of conflict.

Across the Atlantic, the peace in Northern Ireland has far more profound consequences than expected when it is signed by the leaders of the Social Democratic and Labor Party (SDLP), led by John Hume, and the Party. Ulster Unionist (UUP), led by David Trimble.

The SDLP was the moderate Catholic, or Republican, party, while the UUP played the same role for Protestant Unionists.

Hume and Trimble shared the Nobel Peace Prize; Mitchell was inexplicably left out. Neither leader played a significant role in the coalition governments that followed.

Today, the largest Catholic party is Sinn Fein, once the political arm of the Irish Republican Army (IRA), governing in coalition with the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), founded by the torch Protestant Ian Paisley.

Parliamentary elections are scheduled for May and – unthinkable a generation ago – Sinn Fein could form the next government. Support for DUP has plunged.

The reason, in a nutshell, is Brexit – the curious decision by voters in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (and Scotland and Wales) to sever ties with the Union. European Union (EU) in an almost simultaneous 2016 referendum with Donald Trump’s election.

Trump is not in power, but Boris Johnson, the Brexit “genius”, was apparently thriving as prime minister, chasing the opposition and leaving the once formidable Labor Party with rump status.

Johnson is a curious mix – an Oxford-educated curator at ease in the highest circles, but exhibiting a rowdy, savage appearance and ‘common man’ theatricality. Like Trump, he invents it as he goes.

Johnson is now in the throes of serious political problems, with two-thirds saying he should step down. These are – or seemingly – boozy parties in Downing Street, the Prime Minister’s residence and office, at the height of pandemic shutdowns.

The storm has grown and is the subject of a formal, but independent investigation, apparently a little less substantial than our January 6 committee.

What it really is, however, is Johnson’s Brexit mess, in which, despite its bluster, Europe holds all the cards.

Johnson made promises he couldn’t keep. Famous, the former journalist wrote two editorials ahead of the Brexit vote, one for ‘Remain’ and one for ‘Leave’ and then for ‘Leave’ as he seemed to be winning.

Initially, the Conservatives and Labor were straddling the issue that separated the two parties; Johnson became the decisive leader and won the 2019 parliamentary election.

Yet he was still trying to square the circle. The Good Friday Agreement specifies that there can be no customs border between the Republic of Ireland, comprising most of the island, and the six counties of Northern Ireland.

It’s enshrined in the EU charter, and Johnson knew he couldn’t change it. Yet he promised the DUP that somehow there would be no customs border between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK.

Brexit has gone ahead and goods that once moved freely across the Irish Sea are subject to inspections, fees and delays, hurting the economy.

Johnson charms English voters, but doesn’t deceive those in Northern Ireland, who rightly feel betrayed.

We are a long way from a resolution, but we can predict the day of another referendum – a referendum uniting Ireland, the north and the south, in the EU, saying goodbye to the UK. Already, demographic changes have made Catholics and Protestants equal in the North; the benefits of EU membership are tempting.

If that happens, the Scottish National Party could force another independence referendum. Scotland voted overwhelmingly against Brexit and could thus join the EU.

That would leave Boris Johnson’s successor with the United Kingdom of England and Wales, where it was in 1607, four centuries ago.

Americans sometimes aspire to the clear lines of British parliamentary government, as opposed to our own divided powers.

However, the election of Donald Trump may only have short-term consequences. Brexit could be much more sustainable.

Douglas Rooks, editor, commentator and journalist from Maine since 1984, is the author of three books. His first, “Statesman: George Mitchell and the Art of the Possible”, is now available in paperback. He welcomes comments to[email protected]

]]>
Pressure mounts on No10 to reduce Covid isolation time to five days https://obotafumeiro.com/pressure-mounts-on-no10-to-reduce-covid-isolation-time-to-five-days/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 13:28:34 +0000 https://obotafumeiro.com/pressure-mounts-on-no10-to-reduce-covid-isolation-time-to-five-days/

Pressure is mounting on the government to cut the Covid isolation period in England as it emerged that health chiefs had misled ministers about the proposal.

School leaders today backed calls to relax the rules, as they revealed classes of more than 100 children were being taught in gyms due to teacher shortages.

Dame Maura Regan, executive director of the Bishop Hogarth Catholic Education Trust, said schools would “welcome” the move to avoid further disruption in student education.

The support comes after business leaders, MPs and even NHS leaders urged No10 to consider following the United States in reducing isolation to five days to ease pressure on the economy and vital services .

But the move was ruled out by the British Food Safety Agency, which said comparisons with the United States were “not comparable”.

Last night, it emerged that the quango wrongly told ministers that the country’s period of self-isolation begins from the date of a positive test rather than when symptoms first appear. times, as is the case in the UK.

Ministers have repeatedly cited the false advice in recent days when explaining why the government is moving so slowly on the issue.

It also emerged that the UKHSA had not even modeled the safety or benefit of moving to five days until now, as they mistakenly believed that the idea had no chance of being ‘adopted into’. as a policy ”.

Health Secretary Sajid Javid was reportedly angered by the blunders last night and Boris Johnson asked the UKHSA to reconsider the change.

In a thinly veiled search at the health quango, the prime minister’s official spokesperson said today: “If it is possible to go any further, we would like to act quickly. But it must be based on the latest evidence and this work is still in progress. We certainly have not received any other updated advice.

Boris Johnson (pictured returning from his morning run today) has called on the UKHSA to reconsider the possibility of reducing isolation to five days

Boris Johnson (pictured returning from his morning run today) has called on the UKHSA to reconsider the possibility of reducing isolation to five days

UKHSA Patron Saint Jenny Harries, the former Deputy Chief Medical Officer who received the title of Lady in New Year's Honors.  She has been criticized in the past for defending the decision to drop testing and contact tracing at the start of the pandemic, which was widely viewed as a failure

UKHSA Patron Saint Jenny Harries, the former Deputy Chief Medical Officer who received the title of Lady in New Year’s Honors. She has been criticized in the past for defending the decision to drop testing and contact tracing at the start of the pandemic, which was widely viewed as a failure

The Prime Minister’s spokesperson revealed that the prospect of cutting the isolation period after testing positive for Covid was not discussed by Cabinet ministers today.

But he said the government “is gathering the latest evidence.”

Covid cases are now on the decline in ALL regions except the North East

Covid cases are now on the decline in all regions except the North East, according to official figures which add to a growing body of evidence that the worst of the Omicron outbreak may be. -has been.

Statistics from the UK Health Safety Agency show rates in London – which was the first region to fall victim to the highly transmissible variant – started to drop before Christmas, raising hopes that the rest of the nation would soon follow the example.

Now, Covid government data shows cases are finally on the decline in seven of England’s other eight regions, suggesting the wave may have peaked in much of the country.

Experts are hoping the Omicron crisis will begin to end naturally after reaching “unbelievable” levels last month.

But there are fears that the promising trajectory may reverse in the coming days as schools return from the Christmas holidays, with infections then spreading across age groups as seen in previous waves.

Despite confusion as to exactly where the country lies on the epidemic curve, ministers face calls to announce how they plan to live with the virus after nearly two years of an endless cycle crippling restrictions.

Deaths barely increased in England’s most recent wave and are currently around half the level of a year’s bad flu, according to the analysis. The number of critically ill hospitalized patients is still stable, although Omicron started to spiral out of control a month ago.

“We want to keep this under review, make sure we have the right approach, you know we’ve gone from 10 to seven. But what we absolutely don’t do is prejudge anything.

A series of other high-ranking ministers are also pushing for the decision, including Mr Javid and Chancellor Rishi Sunak.

The spokesperson was also forced to defend UKHSA boss Jenny Harries, the former deputy chief medical officer who received the title of Lady in New Year’s Honors.

She has been criticized in the past for defending the decision to drop testing and contact tracing at the start of the pandemic, which was widely viewed as a failure.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4’s Today program, Dame Maura said she would support a shortening of the period of isolation.

She revealed that some schools have been forced to combine classes and cram up to 120 children into school rooms because so many staff are no longer isolated.

She said: “Personally, I would welcome that, because I think the most important thing is that there are a lot of staff who don’t actually have any symptoms, a lot of kids who don’t. no symptoms, and I think it’s important to get the staff back as quickly as possible. ‘

It comes after an investigation by the teachers’ union NASUWT found that nearly half of teachers were forced to cover up colleagues who were on sick leave due to coronavirus as distance learning reached its peak. highest level since lockdown.

Dame Maura told Today that “one of the biggest challenges” for schools right now is “effective supply coverage”.

She added: “I think the most important thing we need to remember is that while it’s important for all kids, it’s especially important for students who are actually facing exams, and a lot. of them have had two, two and a half years of disruption and then having a lack of quality education is actually a bigger disruption for them.

On Monday, Mr Johnson said ministers were considering reducing the self-isolation period from seven to five days for fully vaccinated people who test positive for Covid, with the Health Secretary apparently supporting such a move.

A number of Tory MPs have criticized the UKHSA for its misleading advice to ministers regarding the isolation rules.

Former Tory leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith said: “This is yet another example of the exaggerated bad advice ministers have received and which has held back the country.

“The difference between five and seven days is critical to sustaining services in hospitals, schools and the economy. ”

Former Cabinet Minister David Davis said: “This shows why science advisers should be very careful to base their advice on facts rather than pessimistic guesswork.

“If one of our goals is to protect health services, sending people home for unnecessary length of time does not help patients or other health workers.

“We need to see the hard data that justifies this, on a more established basis than their inaccurate claims of the past few weeks.”

Tory MP Andrew Bridgen called for an apology, adding: “This mistake has put the NHS and critical industries under great pressure. This is the kind of background information that politicians, the British public and employers are getting. would expect them to get the correct information.

Regarding the potential reduction of the period of self-isolation, the Prime Minister’s spokesperson said: “If it is possible to go further, we would like to act quickly but this must be based on the latest evidence and this work is still in progress.

“We certainly haven’t received any other updated advice.”

]]>
Why 2022 could upset the Roman curia | Catholic National Register https://obotafumeiro.com/why-2022-could-upset-the-roman-curia-catholic-national-register/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 20:48:59 +0000 https://obotafumeiro.com/why-2022-could-upset-the-roman-curia-catholic-national-register/

VATICAN CITY – Last year ended with a major change in the Roman Curia: the departure of Cardinal Peter Turkson as Prefect of the Dicastery for the Promotion of Integral Human Development.

Pope Francis has decided not to renew the mandate of the 73-year-old Ghanaian cardinal, despite being two years from the usual retirement age.

Cardinal Michael Czerny, Undersecretary of the Migrants and Refugees Section of the Dicastery for the Promotion of Integral Human Development. Pablo Esparza / AIIC.

The Pope has appointed Cardinal Michael Czerny to replace Acting Cardinal Turkson. The Canadian Jesuit, who has overseen the migrant and refugee section of the dicastery since 2016, is 75, the age at which curia officials are supposed to hand in their resignations to the pope.

The departure of Cardinal Turkson means that the Vatican no longer has a single African at the head of a curial department.

The curia has had at least one African departmental head since 1977, with the exception of a brief period from December 2008 to October 2009.

Among the prominent African figures serving in the central bureaucracy of the Catholic Church was Cardinal Bernardin Gantin of Benin, whose curial career from 1977 to 1998 included leadership positions on the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, Pontifical Council Cor Unum and to the Congregation for Bishops.

Cardinal François Arinze.  Padre Mimmo Spatuzzi via Wikimedia (CC BY-SA 3.0).

Cardinal François Arinze. Padre Mimmo Spatuzzi via Wikimedia (CC BY-SA 3.0).

Another notable leader was Nigerian Cardinal Francis Arinze, who served between 1984 and 2008 as President of the Secretariat for Non-Christians (the precursor of the Pontifical Council for Interfaith Dialogue) and Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the discipline of the sacraments. .

Cardinal Robert Sarah, of Guinea, was President of the Pontifical Council Cor Unum and Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship from 2010 to 2021.

Cardinal Peter Turkson, Prefect of the Dicastery for the Promotion of Integral Human Development, during a press conference in the Vatican on July 7, 2020..  Daniel Ibáñez / AIIC.

Cardinal Peter Turkson, Prefect of the Dicastery for the Promotion of Integral Human Development, at a press conference in the Vatican on July 7, 2020. Daniel Ibáñez / CNA.

Cardinal Turkson began serving in the Curia in 2009, when Pope Benedict XVI appointed him President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, which merged with the Dicastery for the Promotion of Integral Human Development in 2016.

With his departure, the highest African prelate in the curia is now the Tanzanian Archbishop Protase Rugambwa, secretary of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples.

Meanwhile, the geographic region of Oceania remains unrepresented at the top of the curia following the departure of Cardinal George Pell. The Australian cardinal served as Prefect of the Secretariat for the Economy from its inception in 2014 to 2019.

Cardinal George Pell gives an interview to EWTN News in Rome, Italy, December 9, 2020. Credit: Daniel Ibáñez / CNA.

Cardinal George Pell gives an interview to EWTN News in Rome, Italy, December 9, 2020. Credit: Daniel Ibáñez / CNA.

This year could see radical changes at the top of the Curia, even without the publication of the Vatican’s long-awaited new constitution which should be called “Predicate evangelium”.

The five-year term of Cardinal Luis Ladaria Ferrer, 77, prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, will expire in July.

Other leaders over the age of 75 include Cardinal Leonardo Sandri (78), prefect of the Congregation for Oriental Churches, Cardinal Marc Ouellet (77), prefect of the Congregation for Bishops, and Cardinal Giuseppe Versaldi ( 78), Prefect of the Congregation. for Catholic education.

They are joined by Cardinal Mauro Piacenza (77), major penitentiary of the Apostolic Penitentiary, and Cardinal Gianfranco Ravasi, President of the Pontifical Council for Culture, who will be 80 in October.

Cardinal Piacenza, head of the Apostolic Penitentiary, celebrates Mass on November 1, 2020, at the Sanctuary of Our Lady of the Third Millennium in Rome, in Tre Fontane.  .

Cardinal Piacenza, head of the Apostolic Penitentiary, celebrates Mass on November 1, 2020, at the Sanctuary of Our Lady of the Third Millennium in Rome, in Tre Fontane.

Meanwhile, Archbishop Fernando Vérgez Alzaga, recently appointed president of the governorate of Vatican City State, will turn 77 in March.

A number of heads of curia are currently under 75 years of age:

Cardinal Pietro Parolin (66), Vatican Secretary of State;

Cardinal Marcello Semeraro (74), prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints;

Bishop Arthur Roche (71), Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments;

Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle (64), Prefect of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples;

Bishop Lazarus You Heung-sik (70), Prefect of the Congregation for the Clergy;

Cardinal João Braz de Aviz (74), Prefect of the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life;

Cardinal Kevin Farrell (74), prefect of the dicastery for the laity, family and life, and camerlingue of the Holy Roman Church;

Cardinal Dominique Mamberti (69 years old), prefect of the Supreme Tribunal of the Apostolic Signing;

Cardinal Kurt Koch (71), president of the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity;

Bishop Filippo Iannone (64), President of the Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts;

Cardinal Miguel Ángel Ayuso Guixot (69), President of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue;

Bishop Salvatore Fisichella (70), president of the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelization;

Bishop Nunzio Galantino (73), president of the Administration of the Patrimony of the Apostolic See (APSA);

Father Juan Antonio Guerrero Alves (62 years old), prefect of the Secretariat for the Economy;

and Paolo Ruffini (65), prefect of the dicastery for communication.

The Roman Curia has 16 Europeans in leadership positions, comprising nine officials from Italy, four from Spain and one from England, France and Switzerland.

There are also three North Americans, two from Canada (Cardinal Ouellet and Cardinal Czerny) and one from the United States (Cardinal Kevin Farrell), although Cardinal Czerny was born in Czechoslovakia and Cardinal Farrell in Ireland.

Bro. Juan Antonio Guerrero.  .  Office of Communication Society of Jesus.

Father Juan Antonio Guerrero. Office of Communication Society of Jesus.

In addition, there are two South Americans, one from Argentina and one from Brazil, and two Asians, from the Philippines and South Korea.

This is an adapted version of an article which first appearance to “ACI Stampa”, the Italian information partner of AIIC.

Source link

]]>
The US economy is making a comeback: 2022 promises to be bright for America https://obotafumeiro.com/the-us-economy-is-making-a-comeback-2022-promises-to-be-bright-for-america/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 21:50:48 +0000 https://obotafumeiro.com/the-us-economy-is-making-a-comeback-2022-promises-to-be-bright-for-america/

West Virginia’s Appalachian state is one of the poorest in America and relies heavily on coal mining for its prosperity and energy needs.

It was in this state that John F Kennedy, armed with a pile of cash, first staked his presidential credentials, persuading an electorate dominated by Protestant evangelicals that it was possible for an Irish Catholic to win the White House.

Six decades later, West Virginia is in need of an upgrade more than ever, with 19% of its population living in extreme poverty, some in tar paper cabins in the hollow of the hills. The death rate exceeds the birth rate.

Biden bouncing? Arguably, the economic renaissance is more of a consequence of its predecessor’s tax cuts for businesses and entrepreneurs.

Despite its economic woes, West Virginia is politically deeply conservative and one of the first states to turn Republican red in a general election.

But one of its senators, Joe Manchin, is a fiscally conservative maverick Democrat who single-handedly is turning the tide against Joe Biden’s presidency.

At the heart of Biden’s election platform was a ‘Build Better’ pledge, an echo of Boris Johnson’s slogan as the election winner.

After initially supporting the US economy through Covid-19 with cash giveaways, which put thousands of dollars in purchasing power in the hands of every US citizen, Biden planned to change the US in the traditions of the Democratic precursors of Franklin D Roosevelt’s “New Deal”. and “Great Society” by Lyndon Johnson.

This forced Biden to mobilize the narrow Democratic tenure in the Senate, where his majority depends on the casting vote of Vice President Kamala Harris.

All he needed was for a Democratic senator to walk the talk and side with the Republicans to throw in the trash the centerpiece of the $ 1.3 trillion infrastructure and social reform bill. Biden’s pounds sterling.

This is precisely what Manchin did when he told the White House that he could not vote for the spending program, which would send an already swelling federal budget deficit into the stratosphere and add to a rate of surprising inflation.

Ironically, updating the crumbling US infrastructure of poorly maintained bridges, rusty railroads and crumbling highways would have benefited West Virginia, as would four weeks of paid family medical leave and an extension. tax credits for households with children.

Biden's majority in the Senate depends on the casting vote of Vice President Kamala Harris (pictured)

Biden’s majority in the Senate depends on the casting vote of Vice President Kamala Harris (pictured)

But Manchin couldn’t bring himself to vote for a bill that also invested heavily in tackling climate change – the enemy of coal king – and higher taxes on entrepreneurship and corporations. “I cannot go on with this bill,” the senator told right-wing Fox News. “I tried everything humanly possible. “

In terms of immediately supporting the U.S. economy, instead of contributing to longer-term productivity gains, the infrastructure and accompanying social legislation were likely unnecessary when they bit the dust in December.

However, the rapid spread of Omicron across the continental United States may well change the US economic outlook and lead to rethinking of the White House and Capitol Hill if the abrupt resumption of the pandemic is halted.

So far, everything has been fine, with the Conference Board’s trade forecast group reporting that confidence was still up in mid-December.

But this investigation will not fully reflect the dangerous Covid infection rates currently reported in the United States.

Before Omicron, the US economy looked in great shape with production rising at an annualized rate of 7 percent in the last quarter of the year.

At the end of December 2021, GDP appeared to be higher than in the same quarter of 2019 and ahead of all other advanced economies except Australia, which is endowed with abundant natural resources.

The main concern on the horizon has been inflation, with economists divided over whether the 6.2 percent consumer price hikes are a temporary phenomenon or a reappearance of the 1980s.

Nobel laureate Paul Krugman, writing in his New York Times column, is among those who believe the inflation hawks are overreacting and a little inflation, above the consensus target of the central bank by 2%, is good for growth.

The danger, in his view, is descending too hard – as Fed Chairman Paul Volcker did in the early 1980s – causing a deep recession and unemployment that took many years to eradicate. .

The United States happens to have almost the opposite problem now.

Private sector forecasters were forecasting 4.5% annual growth for 2021 before the collapse of Build Back and the emergence of Omicron.

As a result, the forecast is lowered by up to one percentage point.

Before Omicron, the US economy looked in great shape with production rising sharply at an annualized rate of 7 percent in the last quarter of the year

Before Omicron, the US economy looked in great shape with production surging sharply at an annualized rate of 7 percent in the last quarter of the year

That would let production increase by an even more than a respectable 3.5 percent. The Build Back Better Act probably wouldn’t have made a big difference in its first year anyway.

With a focus on infrastructure, it was intended to fuel productivity and production in the medium to long term, leaving a lasting legacy for Biden’s first and perhaps only term.

The most troubling issue for the Federal Reserve, the US central bank, is the job market.

Unemployment fell rapidly as the country emerged from the pandemic with an unemployment rate of 4.2% (in November) but still above the pre-pandemic level of just 3.5%.

The mystery of the US job market is now known as the “Great Resignation”.

These are the roughly 5 million American citizens who were previously employed but who voluntarily withdrew from the workforce.

As in the UK, some of these people decided that they were quite able to survive on their income and savings.

Others take the opportunity to start their own business, respecting the country’s entrepreneurial traditions. One consequence is that the ratio of vacancies to unemployed people is at an all time high.

Labor shortages pushed hourly labor costs up 6% in the third quarter. It is this trend that worried the Federal Reserve the most.

For many American consumers, who spend a lot on services, labor costs are the biggest driver of price increases.

To make economic sense, rising wage levels would have to match productivity gains, but so far that doesn’t seem to be happening.

Despite all the headwinds – from Omicron, political deadlock and skyrocketing profits – the United States has come back with a vengeance and no longer appears to be losing its advantage over China, as it was before the pandemic.

The scale of the expansion of the United States has seen foreign companies focus their foreign investments on America when previously they could have looked to the Pacific and Europe.

In addition, American consumer demand, driven in part by helicopter money pouring into people’s bank accounts, has sucked in scarce manufactures and materials, adding to supply problems elsewhere in the world.

Biden may find it difficult to change the political direction of crude American capitalism with a more interventionist approach, but despite Omicron he is presiding over an economic renaissance.

This is arguably a consequence of the tax cuts by Donald Trump’s much ridiculed predecessor for businesses and entrepreneurs.

This is something the chatty classes prefer not to say.

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on it, we may earn a small commission. This helps us fund This Is Money and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.

Source link

]]>
Kim Jong Un highlights North Korea’s food crisis in year-end speech https://obotafumeiro.com/kim-jong-un-highlights-north-koreas-food-crisis-in-year-end-speech/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 00:29:17 +0000 https://obotafumeiro.com/kim-jong-un-highlights-north-koreas-food-crisis-in-year-end-speech/

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un He once again admitted that there was a “food problem” in the country, during a speech that ended an important five-day meeting of his Workers’ Party of Korea.

End-of-year speech, summarized by state media KCNA, Brief reference to “Emergency epidemic prevention work”.

a North Korea She has remained silent during the pandemic, has isolated herself from the rest of the world and has not recognized any local COVID-19 cases.

Most of Kim’s speech focused on the need to increase the country’s agricultural productivity.

He also praised the military progress made during his 10th year in office, but did not specifically mention South Korea or the United States, except for a brief reference to the political directions of inter-Korean relations and Foreign Affairs.

While the North Korean leader did not detail the degree of the food shortage, the World Food Organization has warned of severe food shortages in the country in 2021, including a shortage of hundreds of thousands of tons. rice.

The problem has been exacerbated by severe flooding in some of the country’s most fertile rice-growing areas.

This is not the first time that Kim has become aware of the food situation in the country. In April, the central news agency reported that the leader told people about another “difficult march” during a speech at a high-level political meeting.

The term “Hard March” refers to a period of devastating famine in the early 1990s, when North Korea’s economy collapsed after the collapse of the Soviet Union, halting the flow of help in the country.

It is estimated that hundreds of thousands of people – or up to 10% of the country’s population – starved to death during this period.

In June, Kim admitted the country was facing a “food stress situation” due to the typhoon and flooding in 2020.

That same month, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) estimated that North Korea was in short supply of around 860,000 tonnes of food – enough for just over two months with few supplies. .

On Saturday, the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) reported (31) Kim’s recognition of “unfavorable conditions this year” and his desire “to increase agricultural production and completely solve the country’s food problem.”

(Translated text. Read the original text by clicking here)